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There are many different forms of contraception, but the best one will be the one you can use consistently. Some mechanisms to prevent pregnancy are hormonally based and will need to be ingested. Other products create a physical barrier to prevent pregnancy. Read more to learn about alternative methods of contraception.

If you have medical health problems and have any concerns about using these forms of contraceptives, follow up with your medical health care team. The content in this article is not meant to serve as medical advice.

The “Pill”

Oral contraceptives are one of the most popularly prescribed medications in the world. Nicknamed “the pill”, for short, this form of oral contraception needs to be prescribed to you by a medical professional. It comes in sheets of different coloured tablets which need to be taken consistently every day, down to the hour!

The tight schedule of the pill can be a pain point for many people. If you forget to take your pill, you will not be covered by its contraceptive effects. It would be best if you remained diligent, try setting the alarm on your phone as a reminder to take this medication, and the pill will protect you.

So how does it work? The hormones in the pill stop the female system from entering ovulation; therefore, no egg is released from the ovaries. This naturally prevents the sperm from fertilizing an egg, and pregnancy is avoided.

Pros:

Proven to be 99% effective when taken correctly, easy to take because the capsule is relatively small, can decrease the amount of blood loss, decrease the severity of menstrual cramps, and is generally considered to be an affordable contraceptive option.

Cons:

Some women may experience headaches, breast tenderness, weight gain, and mood changes. If you miss taking your pill more than 12 hours your usual time, you will not be protected, and alternate forms of contraception must be used. This contraceptive is not suited for women above 45, those who smoke cigarettes, history of serious arterial diseases (such as stroke) if you are an individual at high risk for blood clots.

The Cerazette Pill

The cerazette pill is another form of oral contraceptive. It also needs to be prescribed to you by a medical professional. The critical difference between a cerazette pill and a typical birth control pill is the type of hormones in the product.

Cerazette pills only include a synthetic form of progestogen. This hormone’s primary function is to increase the thickness of mucuous at the entrance of the womb, narrowing the passage and making it more difficult for sperm to travel. It also thins the uterus lining, making it an inhospitable environment that prevents any fertilized egg from implanting.

The Cerazette pill does not always stop the ovaries from releasing eggs, unlike the traditional birth control pill counterpart. It will have some success in preventing the ripening of the eggs, but not nearly as much as the conventional birth control pill.

This type of oral contraception is a more suitable choice for women who do not tolerate estrogen-based medications. This product is also typically ideal for breastfeeding women and can be an appropriate choice for post-natal women.

Pros:

Proven to be 99% effective when taken correctly, easy to take because the capsule is relatively small and is generally considered to be an affordable contraceptive option.

Cons:

If you miss taking your pill more than 12 hours your usual time, you will not be protected and must use alternate sources of contraception. This form of birth control is not recommended for women with abnormal vaginal bleeding, a history of breast cancer, liver disease, or serious arterial diseases (such as stroke).

The Intrauterine device (IUD)

This form of birth control offers a physical barrier that prevents sperm from entering the womb. A second version is a hormonally coated IUD, which acts as a physical barrier and simultaneously releases hormones that make the womb inhospitable for conception.

The copper IUD acts as a physical barrier and will prevent the sperm from accessing the egg. The properties of the metal also decrease sperms motility and further reduces the risk of conceiving. A copper IUD can potentially remain in the body for up to 10 years, which is an excellent long term option!

A hormonal IUD will provide the user with protection up to 5 years, which is still a long time, but not as long as the copper alternative.

Pros:

Proven to be 99% effective, and they are suitable for long term planning.

Cons:

Some may find the insertion to be invasive, it can be uncomfortable as the body adjusts, and blood loss can increase for copper IUD users. It also has a higher cost upfront which may be an issue for some.

Implanted Contraceptive

Women who regularly forget to swallow their oral contraceptives were thrilled when the option of an implanted contraceptive came into existence. The device is small, similar to a matchstick, and will release hormones into your system.

An implanted contraceptive is inserted into the arm, just below the skin. You can feel it after healing, which can be strange for squeamish individuals.

The device needs to be replaced every three years because it will deplete hormones over time and become ineffective.

This method of contraception is the perfect solution for women who tolerate the same hormones found in the pill but forget to take their tablets consistently! Having this device implanted in the body leaves you to follow your schedule freely, and you are freed from any panic associated with forgetting to take the pill.

Pros:

Proven to be 99% effective. There is virtually no action required from the user other than remembering to replace the device every three years (or as long as contraception is needed).

Cons:

Some may find this option invasive, with decreased libido, mild insulin resistance and mood swings.